And All that Bad Writing

We have all gone through that stage of writing where we have horrible grammar, head hopping, 3rd person to 1st person perspective changes, huge plot holes, and cringy slang. And we've all probably gone through that stage more than once! At least, I know I have!


Since I started writing when I was about 11 years old and didn't ever stop, I'm sure I've hit every bad developmental stage or writing possible. Especially during those angsty, trendy teen years.


In order to commemorate that horrible writing while also encouraging anyone else who's not sure if their writing is ever going to get better (trust me, it will) I have complied some of my oldest and most embarrassing writing moments for you to read through and laugh over. It was almost painful to go through my old writing but also endearing to see just how far I've come.


You can click on the images to enlarge them. This is a chapter from the book called The Unexpected that May and I were writing together. Eric and Andromeda were my characters while Wilson and Ariana were hers.

These are some pictures of a few written scenes from the same book.



And these last pics are of possibly my clingiest writing ever. It's the intro to a book about 4 people from Atlantis, though they don't know that yet.







I really hope you enjoyed reading these! Did you uber cringe or relate? What are some of your most embarrassing writings? I'd love to hear about them!


To those of you who might be struggling with the quality of your writing, I hope this has encouraged you. All good authors started out at the bottom, just like all musicians started out with off-key notes and artists with imperfect lines and circles. You will get better the more you write. Practice is everything but even more so is patience and grace. And even more important is that you're having fun. I never once looked down on my writing because I didn't compare myself to other writers (unfortunately that came later), and I didn't compare myself to other writers because I wasn't writing for anyone but myself. What mattered most was that I loved the story, the characters, and I was having fun writing the book I wanted to read. Essentially, that should always be at the center of your writing. Once you have fallen in love with your stories and characters, you won't be worried about the quality. The quality will build over time. And so will the overwhelming need to show someone else. And then, instead of comparing yourself to others, you'll simply be proud of what you have created. Because as long as you love it, then someone always will.


May the suns smile upon your presence!

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